South Sound Strategy: Salmon

Salmon

Attribute(s) Common to this Focus Area

  • Freshwater Quality
  • Benthic Macroinvertebrate Populations
  • Marine Water Quality

Background

South Puget Sound is home to ten species of native salmon, and is a documented feeding ground for stocks from other Puget Sound waters, which dip into the South Sound to feed. Salmon are a favorite food of orcas, are highly prized by anglers and commercial fisherman, and are an important cultural and economic resource for tribes.

Status Snapshot

  • There are over 500 miles of salmonid-bearing streams in the South Sound with documented presence of Chinook, Coho, Sockeye, Chum, and Pink salmon as well as steelhead and bull trout. The McNeil Island and Budd Inlet areas have the least amount (1.1 miles and 5.3 miles) and Nisqually watershed has the most extensive presence (189 miles).
Documented Presence of Key Salmonid Species by Assessment Unit
Budd Inlet Bull Trout Chinook Chum Coho Steelhead Total (miles)
Carry Inlet   1.8 2.0 3.5   7.3
Case Inlet   2.0 5.4 10.1 12.7 30.2
Chambers/Clover   6.9 31.1 37.4 18.9 94.3
Deschutes   0.3 22.1 20.7 11.1 54.3
Eld Inlet   9.0 2.8 7.2 2.9 21.8
Hammersley Inlet & Oakland Bay   4.9 3.6 15.3 4.2 28.0
Henderson Inlet   10.6 21.4 44.7 39.0 115.7
McNeil Island group   3.4 5.4 13.1 17.8 39.6
Nisqually 38.1 36.5 3.5 58.4 56.2 192.7
Totten & Little Skookum Inlets   0.7 20.6 25.5 14.0 60.8
  38.1 76.0 118.9 237.0 176.7 646.8

Targets

No local target proposed, AHSS supports targets outlined in local Salmon Recovery Plans

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